Black is Beautiful

By Gemma Lacey

They may be iconic but it seems there’s less love for this shade of puss. This Halloween, we debunk the myth that black cats are bad news and tell you why charcoal kitties rule.

They can help you find a mate

Single ladies listen up, turn down that Beyoncé track and get yourself a feline in a fetching shade of noir, as according to Japanese beliefs they are known to attract suitors. Closer to home, brides in the East Midlands are often given black cats to bring good luck to their nuptials.

They can show you the money

In Scotland, a strange black cat arriving at your home means you may win the jackpot and gamblers will turn home if a cat crosses their path taking it as an omen they’ll lose if they tempt fate.

They’re magical

In the South of France they’re called matagots or magician cats and are known to bring luck to owners who feed them well and treat them with respect.

Their eyes have special powers

Ancient Egyptians believed black cats’ eyes were yellow because they captured the glow of the setting sun and kept it safe until morning. It’s actually due to a higher melanin content in their skin but we like the Egyptian take better.

They can ward off bad luck in your home

In Feng Shui a black cat figurine is often placed facing north to help ward off evil.

They’re exotic

Known as the parlour panthers, which is far more fun to refer to than a ginger tom.

Finally, one for the boys

They can help your favourite football team out, as proved in 1937 when a black kitten that was meant to bring the team luck sat in a young supporter’s pocket throughout the 1937 FA Cup final, when Sunderland came from behind to beat Preston 3-1.

Sadly, a side effect of all the negative press black kitties are usually getting is that, according to Battersea Dogs & Cats Home staff, they are harder to rehome than their tabby or ginger counterparts. The Old Windsor branch of the charity currently has a family of three black felines, mother Bella, son Jumbo and daughter Pingu looking for a new home. Go to www.battersea.org.uk/cats or call 01784 494443 to find out how you can adopt the sleek beauties.